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Thread: Dixie

  1. #51
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    Point being, I think you miss the point of being "diverse" is you exclude Dixie.

  2. #52
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    For the record, I, for one, never used "diversity" or inclusiveness as motivations except in response to your post. I am not a believer in artificially promoting diversity, but I think schools like Troy University are already wonderful environments for learning about diverse cultures and traditions without it being necessary for the school to make it an administrative priority. That being said:

    If the War of Northern Aggression was about that then why did it take 100 before the Civil Rights Movements? Once again, I still believe the media painted a more dramatic picture of the South as a "Whole" and "Culture" than it really was.
    Using the term "War of Northern Aggression" makes it pretty clear where you stand ideologically. That is a very partisan term, more loaded than the related Southern moniker "War Between the States." A serious answer to your question about the Civil Rights movement is that the enfranchisement of blacks was militantly opposed by a wide cross-section of Southern society through the enactment of Jim Crow laws, lynchings, the general apathy of society at large (all parts of the country), and the willful pandering of the Democratic politicians in Washington. One book I had the pleasure to read (while at Troy University, as a matter of fact) that extensively covers the political history of the many states during that period is V.O. Key's Southern Politics. It's pretty much the authoritative source on that period.

    To the second aspect of your statement, you are somewhat right. The South, while a distinctive area of the country, is still an amalgamation of cultures and norms that can very different between Alabama, Virginia, and Florida. A book I recommend on that subject which I only recently read is Away Down South: A History of Southern Identity. Away Down South: A History of Southern Identity.

    My point is that, while you may be able to make an argument that playing Dixie at school-sanctioned events would bring "diversity" to those functions, I really don't see how that answers the argument that it would be a negative for our school because it alienates a significant portion of our student body.

    Can you name a present piece of music that alienates us as a white people? It is not as though they are playing black protest songs during football games. I want to see Troy University continue to grow and thrive, and we don't do that by scaring away people to remind a small group of the old days. In the future perhaps the emotional baggage attached to songs like Dixie will have lessened and it can be played without controversy, but we definitely aren't there yet.

    I don't see that as an attack on my culture. I can listen to Dixie anytime I want. Who cares if it is at a TROY football game or in my car on the way there?

  3. #53
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    Jericho, I get ya, trust me. I know what you're saying. I've heard all that same argument over and over and over. Like I said, history is no different than anything else, I can spit data back at you all day that backs my argument such as; what slaves did the Emancipation Proclamation actually free, what laws went into effect in Northern States after the war, colonization thoughts by Lincoln, have you ever read Lincoln's debate with Stephen Douglas while running for president, etc, etc, etc,.... But I am not going to get into a battle of the minds about who knows what about that era in history. I for one also have a Minor in History and live that particular history out on the weekends for entertainment and I can correlate that to my own combat experience. This is not a History message board. Trust me; I get what you are saying. You ask about what songs alienate white people; well I think your question is better suited to be about cultural identity as opposed to songs. To what extreme do we want to talk about this, it's more than just a war, song, particular culture, etc.... That's why I don't want to get to deep into this discussion on this board. Now I would honestly love to meet up with you at a tailgate and discuss our views on history, I'm sure we both could enlighten each other. Plus I don't know anyone down there and would like to have someone to drink a few and jaw a bit.

    I appreciate that you acknowledge that diversity is almost always not the case even though it's always being preached. Diversity only accepts what is socially accepted at the time. It's more of a "popular acceptance" than diversity....

    Good talk and I appreciate your points.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jericho
    Johnny;233899
    For the record, I, for one, never used "diversity" or inclusiveness as motivations except in response to your post. I am not a believer in artificially promoting diversity, but I think schools like Troy University are already wonderful environments for learning about diverse cultures and traditions without it being necessary for the school to make it an administrative priority. That being said:



    Using the term "War of Northern Aggression" makes it pretty clear where you stand ideologically. That is a very partisan term, more loaded than the related Southern moniker "War Between the States." A serious answer to your question about the Civil Rights movement is that the enfranchisement of blacks was militantly opposed by a wide cross-section of Southern society through the enactment of Jim Crow laws, lynchings, the general apathy of society at large (all parts of the country), and the willful pandering of the Democratic politicians in Washington. One book I had the pleasure to read (while at Troy University, as a matter of fact) that extensively covers the political history of the many states during that period is V.O. Key's Southern Politics. It's pretty much the authoritative source on that period.

    To the second aspect of your statement, you are somewhat right. The South, while a distinctive area of the country, is still an amalgamation of cultures and norms that can very different between Alabama, Virginia, and Florida. A book I recommend on that subject which I only recently read is Away Down South: A History of Southern Identity. Away Down South: A History of Southern Identity.

    My point is that, while you may be able to make an argument that playing Dixie at school-sanctioned events would bring "diversity" to those functions, I really don't see how that answers the argument that it would be a negative for our school because it alienates a significant portion of our student body.

    Can you name a present piece of music that alienates us as a white people? It is not as though they are playing black protest songs during football games. I want to see Troy University continue to grow and thrive, and we don't do that by scaring away people to remind a small group of the old days. In the future perhaps the emotional baggage attached to songs like Dixie will have lessened and it can be played without controversy, but we definitely aren't there yet.

    I don't see that as an attack on my culture. I can listen to Dixie anytime I want. Who cares if it is at a TROY football game or in my car on the way there?

  4. #54
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    Good talk and I appreciate your points.
    Alright. :)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug4Troy View Post
    Great post! Despite what redwaver may think I am not a huge fan of the PC movement, but things change. Our school has had many nicknames, from Bulldogs, to Teachers, to Red Wave, to Trojans.

    Change is inevitable, but my loyalty to Troy will NOT change.

    Rep point to you JPSousa!
    The current SOTS stopped playing it back in the early 1990's, it was deemed only to be played by the Alumni band, up intil one day in 1992, when some current band members begged to play "DIXIE" again, well Dr. L agreed to play it until the week they play ASU. Well during pregame before the band went on for pregame, someone left the loud speaker on, and one of the announcers said, "Man look at all the N*****S. It was over the stadium. Well after that it was pulled and was never play with either band again.

    Then in 1998 Robert Smith came in and we started play "Are You From Dixie" and that is when we started playing that.

    There is the reason

  6. #56
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    Well during pregame before the band went on for pregame, someone left the loud speaker on, and one of the announcers said, "Man look at all the N*****S. It was over the stadium. Well after that it was pulled and was never play with either band again.
    Good grief. That's an ugly story I'd never heard before. Pretty embarrassing.

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jericho Johnny View Post
    Good grief. That's an ugly story I'd never heard before. Pretty embarrassing.
    you wanted to know the truth....if you want to know how I know it, I was in the stands!

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by trojanblood View Post
    The current SOTS stopped playing it back in the early 1990's, it was deemed only to be played by the Alumni band, up intil one day in 1992, when some current band members begged to play "DIXIE" again, well Dr. L agreed to play it until the week they play ASU. Well during pregame before the band went on for pregame, someone left the loud speaker on, and one of the announcers said, "Man look at all the N*****S. It was over the stadium. Well after that it was pulled and was never play with either band again.

    Then in 1998 Robert Smith came in and we started play "Are You From Dixie" and that is when we started playing that.

    There is the reason

    Can I add something? I think that '91 was the last year SOTS played Dixie (I think I remember playing it?) I know it was in my green book. Don't recall hearing the comment, but the stink it created-wow. That being said, I do remember playing Dixie as alumni in '99. Not sure when it changed to AYFD, but it was in the Smith years, I believe.


    And yeah, that story is embarrassing.

    JGrimsley
    Troy University Band Alumni
    SOTS 91-97

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgrimsley View Post
    Can I add something? I think that '91 was the last year SOTS played Dixie (I think I remember playing it?) I know it was in my green book. Don't recall hearing the comment, but the stink it created-wow. That being said, I do remember playing Dixie as alumni in '99. Not sure when it changed to AYFD, but it was in the Smith years, I believe.


    And yeah, that story is embarrassing.
    JGrimsley... I don't remember you guys playing it in 99 when I was a Freshman. However, I don't remember a lot of things.
    We are with you all the way! So, get out there team and FIGHT! FIGHT! FIGHT! Let's win to-day!!!

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